Multiplier les possibilits aujourd'hui, pour maximiser l'autonomie demain Fondé en 1951

Des articles et des histoires

Veuillez remarquer que les articles vedette sont affichés dans la langue dans laquelle ils ontété publiés à l'origine.

Les voies parallèles qu’Abby a suivies ont conduit à «une seule porte » Les voies parallèles qu’Abby a suivies ont conduit à «une seule porte »
(CTEO, 2016)

Abby Dalgleish, que sa maman décrit comme étant «le petit bout de chou le plus heureux et le plus joyeux que l’on puisse rencontrer », a presque fini le jardin d’enfants au Centre de traitement pour enfants d’Ottawa (CTEO). Elle aime l’école, connait ses nombres et ses mois et surprend chaque jour sa famille par ses connaissances et compétences.


Abby’s parallel paths help lead the way to ‘one door’ Abby’s parallel paths help lead the way to ‘one door’
(OCTC, 2016)

Five-year-old Abby Dalgleish, described by her mom Christine as “the happiest, most cheerful little bug you will ever meet,” has almost completed junior kindergarten at the Ottawa Children’s Treatment Centre (OCTC). She loves school, knows her numbers and months, and is surprising her family with new knowledge and skills every day.


Une membre du Forum des familles du CHEO se fait la championne de l’intégration du CHEO et du CTEO Une membre du Forum des familles du CHEO se fait la championne de l’intégration du CHEO et du CTEO
(CTEO, 2016)

Connor McHardy ne connaissait que trop le Centre hospitalier pour enfants de l’est de l’Ontario (CHEO) et le Centre de traitement pour enfants d’Ottawa (CTEO). Décrit par sa mère, Mindy McHardy, comme étant «un enfant ayant une santé fragile et dépendant de la technologie», il a dû souvent avoir recours aux deux organismes lors de ses huit brèves années. Le CTEO s’occupait de son développement physique et mental et le CHEO le gardait en vie.


CHEO Family Forum Member Champions Integration of CHEO and OCTC CHEO Family Forum Member Champions Integration of CHEO and OCTC
(OCTC, 2016)

Connor McHardy was all too familiar with the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) and the Ottawa Children’s Treatment Centre (OCTC). Described by his mom, Mindy McHardy, as a “medically fragile and technology-dependent” child, he relied heavily on both organizations throughout his eight short years of life. OCTC focused on his physical and mental development, and CHEO on keeping him alive.


Le concept « d’une seule porte, d’une seule histoire, d’un seul dossier médical» en voie de réalisation grâce à la fusion du CTEO et du CHEO Le concept « d’une seule porte, d’une seule histoire, d’un seul dossier médical» en voie de réalisation grâce à la fusion du CTEO et du CHEO
(CTEO, 2016)

«Avoir un enfant comme Griff est toute une expérience médicale » de dire Jennifer Walker, maman de Griffin Walker, récemment décédé à l’âge de 11 ans de complications en lien avec la paralysie cérébrale. «Mais ce n’est pas parce que nos enfants souffrent de maladies complexes qu’il faut que le système de santé le soit lui aussi.»


OCTC-CHEO Amalgamation Brings Concept of “One Door, One Story, One Chart” Closer to Reality OCTC-CHEO Amalgamation Brings Concept of “One Door, One Story, One Chart” Closer to Reality
(OCTC, 2016)

“It’s quite the medical journey when you have a kid like Griff,” says Jennifer Walker, the mom of Griffin Walker, who recently passed away at the age of 11 from complications related to cerebral palsy. “But just because our kids are complex, doesn’t mean the health-care system has to be.” Simplifying the system is one of the major reasons she is such an advocate for the upcoming amalgamation of the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) and the Ottawa Children’s Treatment Centre (OCTC) – two of the largest pediatric health care providers in the region. As a parent advisor on the OCTC-CHEO Strategic Alliance Task Force, which oversaw a due diligence process to ensure there were no major obstacles to amalgamating, she sees many benefits.


A Glass of Florida Sunshine... A Glass of Florida Sunshine...
(Ottawa Citizen, 2012)

Jake Booth was born with cerebral palsy and suffers scoliosis so severe that he's endured 14 operations over his 10 years. The unlucky 13th procedure, done just over a year ago to insert rods in his back to lessen the possible damage from his deteriorating spine, didn't have the intended outcome, and Jake now uses a walker to get around — or a wheelchair for longer outings, such as when he goes to the mall.


Rick Hansen pays emotional tribute to Ottawa Children's Treatment Centre Rick Hansen pays emotional tribute to Ottawa Children's Treatment Centre
(Ottawa Citizen, 2011)

The Man in Motion made an emotional return Thursday to the Ottawa Children's Treatment Centre, where 25 years ago he inspired a generation of disabled children to live out their dreams.


The Joys of Water-Skiing: Disabled Youth Get a Little Help Making Waves The Joys of Water-Skiing: Disabled Youth Get a Little Help Making Waves
(Ottawa Citizen, 2011)

Sixteen-year-old Effie Corriveau looked chilly but ecstatic when she stepped out of the Rideau River near Osgoode on Wednesday afternoon after her first water-skiing attempt ever. Family, friends and volunteers stood on the bobbing dock, clapping and shouting praises, while Effie swam to shore with instructor Chris Holden and gave everyone two thumbs way up.


RVH Grand Rounds: OCTC Outreach Clinical & Support Services in Renfrew RVH Grand Rounds: OCTC Outreach Clinical & Support Services in Renfrew
(Renfrew Victoria Hospital Newsletter, 2011)

The Ottawa Children's Treatment Centre (OCTC) is celebrating 60 years devoted to helping families, children, youth and some adults coping with physical or developmental disabilities. On April 1, 2003, OCTC opened outreach clinical and support services on the RVH campus to serve families throughout the county closer to their homes.


Treatment Centre: Innovative Support for Special Kids & Their Families Treatment Centre: Innovative Support for Special Kids & Their Families
(Ottawa Life Magazine, 2010)

Imagine that you have a 14 year old son, Jacob, a gifted athlete, who suddenly has a massive stroke and is left unable to walk. Imagine giving birth to a baby who has experienced oxygen deprivation resulting in a diagnosis of cerebral palsy. Or, imagine being a parent who is increasingly anxious about seeing a child retreat into his own world, not speaking or interacting with others. Unless you have or know family facing such challenges, chances are you know little about the Ottawa Children's Treatment Centre (OCTC). However, according to legions of parents, the OCTC is, as Jacob's father Louis puts it, 'the most well-kept secret' in Ottawa.


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